Resources

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This area is designed to compliment our psychodrama training programs as well as hold articles that are stimulating and challenging.

Memory! What is it good for? Absolutely nothing Huh!

Psychologist Elizabeth Loftus studies memories. More precisely, she studies false memories, when people either remember things that didn't happen or remember them differently from the way they really were. It's more common than you might think, and Loftus shares some startling stories and statistics, and raises some important ethical questions we should all remember to consider.

The 10,000 hour story ...

More than 20 years ago, researchers proposed that individual differences in performance in such domains as music, sports, and games largely reflect individual differences in amount of deliberate practice, which was defined as engagement in structured activities created specifically to improve performance in a domain. This view is a frequent topic of popularscience writing—but is it supported by empirical evidence? To answer this question, we conducted a meta-analysis covering all major domains in which deliberate practice has been investigated. We found that deliberate practice explained
26% of the variance in performance for games, 21% for music, 18% for sports, 4% for education, and less than 1% for professions. We conclude that deliberate practice is important, but not as important as has been argued.

Various introductions and written material for self-development psychodrama groups

The following are 20 blurbs for self-development groups that I have run over the last 4 years. They are presented here as examples of how a group can be themed - that is having a particular focus, or un-themed, with a general self-development the focus. I have generally found that a theme warms people up in a particular way, as does a group without a theme. There are no general rules as regards these blurbs except that I, as the group leader, need to feel they are written in such a way that they are true for me, or represent what I am planning to get up to with any participants. Having said that, the general rule is that people are more likely to come if they know me, or if they know someone who knows and recommends me. Less often someone comes because they have been referred by a friend or colleague to ‘check out the local psychodrama groups’ or call the Institute. So these are designed to be read to lighten anyone’s thinking about this area and what the limitations might be – as I believe there are no limitations except being careful with what I promise.

Of great benefit is to have a website up your sleeve to which people can be directed - and this website has material about psychodrama - such as the Psychodrama Australia website has a Frequently Asked Questions section and often I had a special page setting out what usually happens in a self-development psychodrama group. The AANZPA regional website is another place to do this - find referable web pages with psychodrama material.

 

 

The impossibility of straight answers.

Warm-up is something not discussed but is used in all sorts of ways. Here is a great example of what might be called leading questions but may also be seen as warm-up.

Sir Humphrey Appleby demonstrates the use of leading questions to skew an opinion survey to support or oppose National Service (Military Conscription). Taken from the 1st Season of Yes Prime Minister - Episode 2, The Ministerial Broadcast. Yes Prime Minister is a British political satire/ comedy that was aired in the 1980s. The original copyright belongs to BBC. Usage of this clip constitutes fair use for the purpose of education.

 

The impossibility of straight answers.

Sir Humphrey Appleby demonstrates the use of leading questions to skew an opinion survey to support or oppose National Service (Military Conscription).

Taken from the 1st Season of Yes Prime Minister - Episode 2, The Ministerial Broadcast.

Yes Prime Minister is a British political satire/ comedy that was aired in the 1980s. The original copyright belongs to BBC.

Usage of this clip constitutes fair use for the purpose of education.

 

The origins of pleasure - Paul Bloom

Why do we like an original painting better than a forgery? Psychologist Paul Bloom argues that human beings are essentialists — that our beliefs about the history of an object change how we experience it, not simply as an illusion, but as a deep feature of what pleasure (and pain) is. 

I've added this video because it highlights that working with a person’s pre-conscious, non-conscious, and sub-conscious mind, with their automatic responses, and reactions, in such a manner to as to give authenticity to subjective experience, is important. The concept of warm-up, if used by Paul Bloom in his talk, would make absolute sense to anyone trained in Morenian methods. We warm-up to an original painting in one way and to a reproduction in another way.

Leadership - its not about you, duh!

This is an entertaining talk by four-star general Stanley McChrystal who shares what he learned about leadership over his decades in the military. How can you build a sense of shared purpose among people of many ages and skill sets? By listening and learning — and addressing the possibility of failure. What he is teaching is relevant in just about any situation. He is a pretty good story-teller. Some aspects of his talk remind me that in many organisations leadership is networked rather than follows old-style heirarchies. And that relationships rule. And that it isn't easy stuff - this leadership caper.

We are all involved in sales, damn!

This video is presented here as a way to lighten people up, as it lightened me up, as regards the distress or disgust that can easily arise when the word ‘marketing’ is used. Dan Pink is a motivational specialist and, while we can take it or leave it what he presents, I believe that what he has to say is valuable for those of us who want to broaden the reach of psychodrama. His way of doing it is entirely congruent with that of psychodrama, but he uses very different language. For instance he uses the term ‘attunement’ where we might say ‘get with’ or ‘double’ or reverse roles’. And he had a few suggestion the most relevant of which are - use your head and your heart, and be more like yourself.

Dan Pink - The mystery of motivation

This is a short talk by Dan Pink about motivation and the mysteries of it. Motivation theory is quite a large area of theory in psychology but he is having fun pointing out that while many motivation factors are well known in psychology research they have not made the transition to organisation. Particularly the important are of intrinsic motivation: autonomy, mastery and purpose. This is a safe video to send to senior managers as well.

 

Adam Blatners Chapter on Psychodrama in a General Text

This is the text written by Adam Blatner on Psychodrama as a chapter in a general psychology text book. He has edited and updated it many times. It is  afairly comprehensive piece of writing and will suit a person keen to work out where psychodrama fits in the world of psychology and health.